Catchments & Landuse

Catchments & Landuse

Large-scale land use management decisions and investments will employ landscape planning and management methods that take into account riverine ecosystem services with a focus on river health, water supply, aquatic ecosystems and impacts on local livelihoods and development.

Changes in catchments can, for example, mean that less water reaches a river; or that erosion occurs, increasing a river’s sediment load. Industrial development can pollute groundwater and river water. Such changes can have far-reaching impacts on riverine ecologies, water quality and water quantity.

Large-scale land use management decisions and investments will employ landscape planning and management methods that take into account riverine ecosystem services.


 

Why do catchments and landuse matter?

Because water quantity and quality are essential to any number of other human activities and to the environment. The Salween River, for example, is considered one of the world’s ten most polluted rivers because of mining activities in its basin.

The change we seek

Large-scale land use management decisions and investments will employ landscape planning and management methods that take into account riverine ecosystem services with a focus on river health, water supply, aquatic ecosystems and impacts on local livelihoods and development.

WLE and catchments and landuse

Projects working in this WLE Greater Mekong theme explore the ways in which landuse change affects water quantity and quality, proposing ways in which negative trends can be ameliorated through particular types of management intervention.