Water Knowledge Series

Water Knowledge Series

Water Knowledge Series

Water Knowledge is an informal research output from WLE Greater Mekong. It focusses on current discussions and debates around the waters and rivers of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam and the Yunnan Province of China. Water Knowledge is not peer-reviewed.

Water Knowledge Series
  • 2018-10

Knowledge Networks in the Mekong

Knowledge networks, then and now, global or local, are meant to manage knowledge. This report examines knowledge networks in Southeast Asia's Mekong region. Water Knowledge is intended as an informal research output focusing on current research discussions and debates around the waters and rivers of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam… Read More
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  • 2018-10

Coping with changes in access to biodiversity and natural resources along the Mekong mainstream and tributaries

The relationship between people and natural resources in the Mekong River Basin is intimate. Up and down the river, natural resources in the form of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs), fish, water, ‘Other Aquatic Animals’ (OAAs), agro-ecosystems and other – frequently common property – resources form a significant part of livelihoods.… Read More
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  • 2018-09

Perceptions of Integrated Water Resources Management in Myanmar

The WLE research project examined perceptions of four constructs underlying IWRM, policy integration, public participation, gender inclusion, and adaptivity among people responsible for the implementation of future water management plans in Myanmar. Read More
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  • 2018

Hydropower resettlement in the Mekong region

The number of people displaced by hydropower dam construction has been growing steadily as more dams are constructed on the Mekong mainstream and its tributaries. More dams are proposed because the governments of Mekong countries regard them as a means to tackle poverty and stimulate economic growth (MRC, 2009). Many… Read More
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  • 2018-08

The impacts of hydropower and mining on water quality: an example from the Nam Ngum catchment, Lao PDR

Water quality can be thought of as a measure of the suitability of water for a particular use based on selected physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. The water quality of rivers and lakes changes with the seasons and geographic areas. There is no single measure that constitutes ‘good’ water quality.… Read More
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